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Parents Right to Know 2020-2021
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Letter of Acknowledgement for the School Compact and Parent & Family Engagement Plan:

 Letter

spanish
School Parent Compact 2019-2020

Last date revised 08/26/2019

Schoo; Parent Compact 2019-2020
compact 2

Title I Parent and Family Engagement Plan 2019-2020- Plan de Compromiso de Titulo I y Convenio de Padres-Escuela 
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2

3

Title I

 

 SCHOOLWIDE IMPROVEMENT PLAN - KES - 2019-2020

SCHOOLWIDE/SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN TEMPLATE

School Name: Kilpatrick Elementary School

District Name: Clayton County Public Schools

Principal Name:Candice N. Jester

School Year: 2019-20

School Mailing Address: 7534 Tara Road, Jonesboro, Ga 30236

Telephone: 770-473-2790

District Title I Director/Coordinator Name: Katrina Thompson

District Title I Director/Coordinator Mailing Address: 1058 Fifth Avenue Jonesboro, Ga 30236

Email Address: katrina.thompson@ clayton.k12.ga.us

Telephone: 770-473-2700

ESEA WAIVER ACCOUNTABILITY STATUS

(Check all boxes that apply and provide additional information if requested.)

Priority School

Focus School

Title I Alert School

Principal’s Signature:

 

Date:

Title I Director’s Signature:

 

Date:

Superintendent’s Signature:

 

Date:

Revision Date: 8-15-19

Revision Date:

Revision Date:

 

 


SWP Template Instructions

·         All components of a Title I Schoolwide Program Plan and a School Improvement Plan must be addressed.  When using SWP and SIP checklists, all components/elements marked as “Not Met” need additional development.

·         Please add your planning committee members on the next page.

·         The first ten components in the template are required components as set forth in Section 1114 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA).

·         Please submit your School Improvement Plan as an addendum after the header page in this document.


 

Planning Committee Members

NAME

MEMBER’S SIGNATURE

Candice Jester, Principal

Genell Wright

Jennifer Teagle-McGill, DES Teacher

Mark Lively, EL Teacher

Iyana James, Gifted Teacher

Krystle Shackleford, Kindergarten Grade Level Chair

Donnise Bartholomew, 1st Grade Level Chair

Tatia Beal, 2nd Grade Level Chair

Jennifer Rippy, 3rd Grade Level Chair/ELA Contact

Sheila Moses, 4th Grade Level Chair

Daphine Harris, 5th Grade Level Chair/SS Contact

Cristiane Idowu, Parent Liaison

Elva Lumbard, Counselor

Anthony Rivera, Student

Zion Mathis, Student

Alejandra Chavez, Parent

Adelaida Juarez, Parent

Victoria Mills, Parent

Dr. Rosemarie Bryan, Early Intervention Teacher

Natalie Marson, Bookkeeper

Clarence Burnough, Community Partner (100 Black Men)

Kelly Barnes, School SACS Designee

 


 

SWP/SIP Components

1. A comprehensive needs assessment of the entire school, (including taking into account
the needs of migratory children as defined in Section 1309(2)) that is based on information which includes the achievement of children in relation to the state academic content standards and the state student academic achievement standards described in Section 1111(b)(1).


 

Response:

  1. We have developed our school wide plan with the participation of individuals who will carry out the comprehensive school wide/school improvement program plan. Participants met as the school Leadership Team and discussed goals and strategies for the 2017-2018 school year. Next, the Leadership Team shared the proposed goals and strategies with grade level and department teachers, parents, and community. Finally, the Leadership Team met to share the feedback from teachers, staff, parents, and the community and revised the SWP accordingly.

 

  1. Each core academic content coordinator collaborated with the department’s teachers to

analyze its data. Georgia Milestones, DIBELS, district benchmark, and common assessment data were reviewed by the all students group and various subgroups. Teams of teachers identified potential reasons or causes for areas in which students struggled. In addition, our teachers partnered with stakeholders, our support staff that includes counselors, social workers, administrators, and others to examine student data such attendance, discipline, retention rate, response to intervention, and placement of students in various support programs. Throughout the process, we reviewed the following data.

§ Student and Teacher Attendance

§ Retention Rate

§ Parental Involvement

§ Discipline Infractions

§ TKES/LKES Data

§ District Benchmark Results

§ Individual Education Plans

§ 504 Accommodations

§ RTI/SST

§ GKIDS

§ Surveys (Teacher/Student/Parents)

§ Georgia Milestone Assessment System

§ DIBELS

 

All data were presented in a chart format that visually represented student performance over the past three years to allow groups to easily identify weaknesses and strengths in student performance. Brainstorming and Q&A sessions were held for teachers within their respective departments and information obtained was presented during Title I meetings for further consideration. Final determination about strengths and weaknesses are presented in component 1D of this plan. Throughout the development of this plan, we took into account the needs of all students, including students with disabilities, English Learners, homeless, migrant, and other subgroups. The following instruments, procedures, or processes were used to obtain this information:

§ eDirect

§ SLDS

§ mClass Platform

§ Edutrax (Illuminate, effective August 2019)

§ iReady

 

 

  1. Kilpatrick does not have a migrant student population at this time. In the event the school gains a migrant population, the school will follow district, state, and federal guidelines to ensure that these students are afforded the same opportunities as all other students. We will diagnose their needs, create and maintain a profile based on the needs assessment, plan engaging instruction, teach GA Common Core Performance Standards, assess for mastery, reteach with appropriate interventions/RTI and administer summative assessments to determine if mastery is achieved or further intervention is required. All parents or guardians enrolling a child in the school will receive a survey that determines whether or not the child will be identified as migrant. The original form is sent to the Office of Federal Programs to be forwarded to the GaDOE-Migrant ABAC Office. A copy of the completed survey is maintained in the student’s cumulative folder.

 

  1. We have reflected on current achievement data that will help the school understand the subjects and skills in which teaching and learning need to be improved. We have also reviewed data for Writing, Math, Science, English, and Social Studies. Although our teachers work continuously to extend student learning in a way that each child gains a deeper understanding of the content, there continues to be additional room for growth in all content areas with a laser like focus on math and English Language Arts.

 

SCHOOL DEMOGRAPHIC DATA 2019-20

Total Enrollment

696

Asian

11

Black

346

Hispanic

290

Multiracial

22

White

25

English Language Learners

170

Gifted

28

Students with Disabilities

58

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Georgia Milestones Assessment – End of Grade

ELA

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

Beginning Learner

46

42.7

36

Developing Learner

38

40.3

39.5.

Proficient Learner

14

14.2

21.6

Distinguished Learner

0.02

2.72

2.9

Developing/Proficient

52

54.63

61.1

Proficient/Distinguished

14

14.92

24.5

Developing/Proficient/Distinguished

52

57.35

64

Math

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

Beginning Learner

32

44.3

40.2

Developing Learner

45

50.1

37.0

Proficient Learner

19

18.4

21.3

Distinguished Learner

0.03

0.05

1.3

Developing/Proficient

64

68.7

58.3

Proficient/Distinguished

19

19.7

22.6

Developing/Proficient/Distinguished

64

69.6

59.6

Science

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

Beginning Learner

51

44

52.4

Developing Learner

31

34

32.7

Proficient Learner

17

25

14.7

Distinguished Learner

0.02

1.7

0

Developing/Proficient

48

59.4

47.4

Proficient/Distinguished

17.02

30.3

14.7

Developing/Proficient/Distinguished

65.02

60.3

47.4

Social Studies

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

Beginning Learner

54

41.2

35.2

Developing Learner

33

49.1

57.6

Proficient Learner

11

8

7.2

Distinguished Learner

0.08

1.7

0

Developing/Proficient

44

61.9

64.8

Proficient/Distinguished

11.08

14.6

7.2

Developing/Proficient/Distinguished

55.08

63.7

64.8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GMAS Grade Level Comparison

Subject/Grade

SY18 (PL+)

SY19 (PL+)

Difference

ELA – 3rd

16%

30%

14%

ELA – 4th

27%

30%

3%

ELA – 5th

19%

20%

1%

Math – 3rd

14%

26%

12%

Math – 4th

17%

26%

9%

Math – 5th

15%

12%

-3%

Science – 5th

26%

12%

-12%

Social Studies – 5th

10%

7%

-3%

 

 

 

After a thorough review of the assessment data, we found the following areas of concern:

Overall Academic Performance:

 

  • Review of the 2018-19 GMAS data for all students shows a decrease in the percentage of students scoring Proficient or better, Science and Social Studies from the previous year. (Science – 19 % Social Studies – 5%)
  • The 2018-19 GMAS data reveals a slight increase in the percentage of students scoring proficient or better in ELA and math in grades 3-5.
  • Mathematical domain areas that were the weakest were that of Numbers and Operations (Base 10, Algebraic Thinking and Fractions).
  • Reading domain areas that presented students with the lowest level of success were reading and vocabulary and reading and writing/constructive response (informational text and extended responses).
  • There was a decrease of 4% or more in beginning learners across all content areas and an increase in the number of proficient in ELA, Math and SS. However, the percentage of student proficient or better in less than 25% in ELA and Math.
  • The data reveals there is need for more intentional focus on science and social studies in the earlier grades as well as an emphasis on strategies that support standard based learning and conceptual understanding at the 5th grade level for math, science and social studies. (ADI and DBQ).
  • Gaps exist between SWD and all other subgroups in all academic areas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lexile Data

Grade Level

Below Stretch Band

Within Stretch Band

Above Stretch Band

Comparison Years

17/18

18/19

17/18

18/19

17/18

18/19

3rd

37% Below 520

36% Below 520

54% Between 520 and 820

50% Between 520 and 820

10% Above 820

14% Above 820

4th

55% Below 740

56% Below 740

34% Between 740 and 940

33% Between 740 and 940

10 % Above 940

11% Above 940

5th

44% Below 830

37% Below 830

38% Between 830 and 1010

37% Between 830 and 1010

18% Above 1010

27% Above 1010

 

  • Review of the 2018-19 Lexile data levels shows a decrease (average of 3%) in the percentage of students below the stretch in grades 3-5. Although there was a slight decrease in the percentage of students within the stretch band from 17-18 to 18-19, there was an increase in the percentage of students above the stretch band at each grade level.
  • The percentage of 3rd and 4th graders within the stretch band and above increased by 4 percentage points since the previous year. While the percentage in 5th grade increased by 12% points.

 

 

 

DIBELS Data –

19-20 BOY (DIBELS 8th Edition)

Kindergarten and First Grade

 

 

 

 

 

DIBELS Next – EOY 2018-19

 

 

Because DIBELS assessments editions have changed the areas of assessment, and therefore a comparison from the EOY in 2018-19 to BOY 19-20 school will not provide accurate data on students’ growth from Kindergarten to First Grade.

 

Overall, reading data reflects that in grades, a focus on decoding will be necessary for kindergarten students and on phonemic awareness and reading accuracy for first grade students.

 

 

iReady Data – Diagnostic Data (BOY)

 

 

 

 

Data show that more than 50% of all students are at Tier 2 or higher. Data also shows a correlation between GMAS data and iReady data. It evident that a laser like focus on domains in numbers and operations (algebraic thinking, Base 10 and fractions) and comprehension (literary and informational text).

 

 

 

 

ESOL Percent of Students Increasing to a Higher Performance Band on ACCESS

1st Grade

2nd Grade

3rd Grade

4th Grade

5th Grade

No Positive Movement

2

9

3

3

9

Movement within the Band

7

7

5

5

2

Move one band

7

6

4

1

4

Move more than one band

9

8

9

15

3

Total Number of Students Tested

25

30

21

24

18

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

118 ESOL students were assessed on ACCESS in the spring of 2019. Data show 56% of tested students advanced at least one performance band from the previous year (spring 2018).

 

 

 

GMAS Median Student Growth Percentile (SGP)

Content

4th Grade

5th Grade

 

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

ELA

52

50

 

54

45

 

Math

54

29

 

70

36

 

 

 

CCRPI Data

 

CCRPI

School Year

CCRPI Score

Content Mastery

School Progress

Closing the Gaps

Readiness

Climate Rating

Star Rating

PPE Percentile

2017-2018

61.2

42.2/12.6

69.1/24.1

66.7/24.1

72/14.4

4

2.5

$9819.96

2018-2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Performance Goals are based on the minimum requirement of 3% growth. The performance goal for 2018-19 is 2018-19 is 69.8 with the goal of 70.2. Growth goals based on current baseline shows an 11 percentage point increase or more is needed across all content areas to meet district performance goals.

 

 

We have based our plan on information about all students in the school and identified students and groups of students who are not yet achieving to the State Academic content standards and the State student academic achievement standard including:

 

 

  • Economically disadvantaged (ED) students who may experience lack of opportunities or exposure to a variety if outside learning opportunities. 94% percent of the student population are economically disadvantaged. CCRPI reports indicate these students met subgroup performance in ELA, Science, and Social Studies, but did not meet the state targets.
  • Students from a variety of racial and ethnic groups who have diverse ways of acquiring new information.
  • Students with disabilities who have individualized educational plans to support the most appropriate instructional strategies to utilize and instructional modifications that are necessary to address their learning strengths and weaknesses. Students with disabilities make up ten percent of our 3rd, 4th, and 5th graders student population. Previous CCRPI reports indicate these students did not meet subgroup performance in any content area.
  • Students with limited English proficiency sometimes require instructional modifications to effectively have access to the curriculum to gain understanding. ELL students make up 20% of our 3rd, 4th and 5th grade student population.

 

  1. The data has helped us reach conclusions regarding achievement or other related data. The major strengths we found in our program were as follows:

 

  • The major needs we discovered were in grades K-5 are Numbers and Operations; Operations and Algebraic Thinking; Measurement and Data; Reading and Vocabulary; Reading and Writing (Response to Literature and Informational Text)
  • The needs we will address in grades K-5 are: Numbers and Operations, Reading and Vocabulary, Reading and Writing, Measurement and Data, History, Geography, all Sciences.
  • The specific academic needs of students that will be addressed are Numbers and Operations in grades K-5; Reading and Vocabulary in grades K-5; and Writing and Language in grades 3-5.

 

Teams of stakeholders, including parents, teachers, and administrators, used a variety of protocols and tools to identify root causes that explain our low student performance in mathematics and science. From the process, we discovered the following causes for low academic achievement.

  • Teachers are not implementing ineffective instructional practices.
  • Teachers not planning instruction based on student needs and data.
  • Teachers need comprehensive training on explicit instruction and utilizing data to drive instruction.
  • Parents understanding how to fully support their child’s learning at home.

 

 

G. We believe that we address these causes of low achievement our students will show growth in all academic core areas. Our measurable goals are listed below:

Increase the percentage of students performing at the proficient and distinguished level on the Georgia Milestones Assessment in all core content areas (Math, English Language

Arts, Science, and Social Studies) by 3%.

  • Decrease the student achievement gap by 5% between the EL and SWD subgroups in all core content areas (Math, English Language Arts, Science, and Social Studies), in comparison to all students on the Georgia Milestones Assessment on the End of Grade Tests.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Schoolwide reform strategies that:

Response:

Kilpatrick’s staff considered three key questions when determining school-wide reform strategies. They are:

1. How will the strategy close achievement gaps?

2. How will we know the reform strategies are successful?

3. How will we make changes to our reform strategies if they are not effective?

 

In addition to the guiding questions, research-based instructional strategies that meet the diverse needs of our learners will be employed. Additionally, we will continue implement strategies that are directly aligned with the district’s school improvement plan which focuses on high performance practices.

 

School-wide strategies will be employed to address the needs of all students, particularly those students and subgroups demonstrating content area deficiency. In order to facilitate the aforementioned researched based strategies, the following measures will be taken in order to ensure full implementation:

 

  • Continued support in TKES to aid teachers effective use of assessment data in order to guide instruction
  • Weekly review of lesson plans by the principal, assistant principal, and site facilitators to ensure alignment with curriculum guides, pacing and district goals.
  • Vertical planning in order to provide teachers with a more well- rounded view of future grade level expectations.
  • Frequent formative assessments to provide data which will determine level of mastery. These assessments will be discussed in weekly grade level meetings
  • Response To Intervention (RtI)
  • Weekly observations of teaching staff and specific, immediate feedback by administrative team
  • Integration of technology into lessons.

 

The comprehensive list below is comprised of various researched-based strategies which

 

We have chosen to use the work of Victoria Bernhardt, Data Analysis for Continuous School Improvement as a framework for how we should use data and information to improve teaching for every teacher, and learning for every student. We will also focus on the practices tied to high performing schools. While searching for interventions and preventions that will help us meet our students’ academic needs and staff’s professional development needs as well as help us meet our goals, we believe the following strategies will prove to be effective. They are:

 

 

  1. Mandate that teachers implement the district’s explicit instruction/gradual release of responsibility framework and the high performance framework practices (Deconstructing standards, Evidence Based Writing, Academic Discussion and High Level Questioning) with high levels of fidelity.

 

  1. Require all teachers to use small group methods that are based on a variety of balance assessments and intervention monitoring to better meet the needs of all learners.

 

  1. Require all teachers to provide appropriate scaffolding and support that help students master a complex and rigorous curriculum while ensuring these supports and scaffolding are gradually removed at appropriate times.

 

  1. Require that all core content area teachers know how to and use scoring rubrics and exemplars as instructional tools.

 

  1. Mandate that all teachers integrate technology into their lesson as tools that extend and/or enhance learning.

 

  1. Collaborative and Vertical planning are weekly mandates with meeting documentation.

 

 

Two reform strategies we are currently implementing are Explicit and Guided Instruction and High Performance practices. We have been implementing these strategies for two years. As a result of our root cause analysis discussions, we found that additional professional learning is needed for our staff.

  • Small Group Instruction: Grouping students based on learning styles, learning needs, and understanding of concepts. Groups are fluid.

· Differentiated Instruction: Students are provided with instruction that meets their individual needs. Differentiation for students may be in the form of content, process, or product. The basis for differentiation is readiness, interest, and learner profile.

· Writing Across the Curriculum - boost children’s critical thinking skills by teaching them how to develop constructive responses and requiring them to write in all content areas.

· Science and Social Studies Integration – Instruction and planning using framework to integrate math with ELA and Math, DBQs and ADI.

· Mathematical Practices – Implementation and integration of the 8 mathematical practices during math instruction blocks.

 

 

 

· Use effective methods and instructional strategies that are based on scientifically based research that:

o Strengthen the core academic program in the school.

o Increase the amount and quality of learning time, such as providing and extended school year and before- or after-school and summer programs and opportunities, and help provide an enriched and accelerated curriculum.

o Include strategies for meeting the educational needs of historically underserved populations.

Response:

We are continuing our study of ASCD’s Framework for Intentional and Target Instruction, and ICLE’s Moving Beyond Quadrant A to increase rigor in the classroom. Our goal is to provide students with an effective and competent teacher, implement explicit and well-planned lessons, provide students with appropriate scaffolding and learning supports, and prepare students to be better learners by using strategies that are grounded in research.

 

The 10 Teacher Keys Effectiveness System (TKES) standards also provide us with a source of scientifically based research strategies and methodologies. These tools, if used with fidelity, will collectively strengthen our academic program, open opportunities to use instructional time more effectively, and grant struggling and unserved student populations more learning support.

 

One effective method and instructional strategies based on research implemented at Kilpatrick Elementary School assessing students’ reading level through DIBELS, iReady/Ready and myON. The assessment provides us with students’ Lexile scores. We use the data along with Lexile scores from the Georgia Milestones to identify students who might have challenges with reading and understanding complex text often found in science and social studies textbooks.

 

We go beyond of simply making digital tools available to students. Our teachers purposefully infuse technology in the curriculum by planning and preparing for students based on their needs.

 

This focus on integrating technology has increased. Students are provided with more time to use technology to write and problem solve. We are shifting the use of technology from using the tools for remediation and test preparation to ensuring learners use technology to create, collaborate, analyze and synthesize information.

In addition, we provide students with opportunities to extend their learning time through intensive instruction during after school hours and on Saturdays. Our Saturday Bridge program provides extended opportunities for learning and focuses on providing students in grades 2-5 with Elementary School readiness skills in math, science, social studies, and language arts.

 

 

 

· Include strategies to address the needs of all children in the school, but particularly the needs of low-achieving children and those at risk of not meeting the state student achievement standards who are members of the target population of any program that is included in the schoolwide program which may include:

o counseling, pupil services, and mentoring services;

o college and career awareness and preparation, such as college and career guidance, personal finance education, and innovative teaching methods, which may include applied learning and team-teaching strategies; and

o the integration of vocational and technical education programs.

 

Response:

Student support strategies that are used to address the needs of all students included identifying students who need support by subgroup and by need. Kilpatrick Elementary School teachers and administrators closely monitor students’ academic performance. We regularly review grades at each grading period to identify at-risk learners. We use the information to design and implement learning supports that will help these students get back on track. Targeted populations such as ESOL students and Students with Disabilities are well supported through our co-teaching model. Students in these subgroups are taught by highly-qualified teachers and are held to the same high expectations as our regular student population. General education teachers work collaboratively with special education teachers to disaggregate the data of GMAS scores, Interim assessments, and EL ACCESS testing to determine if an achievement gap exists.

 

Additionally, we use our counselors and student/pupil services to help us identify not only academic supports for our students but also social supports. Counselors conduct monthly guidance sessions with students to help them set goals, and review their progress toward goals. Special Education students have Individualized Education Plans (IEP) that correlate to their grade level curriculum. Student level is also a consideration when writing their IEPs. EL students also have modification plans that allow the students to learn grade level content while learning English. EL and Special Education teachers work collaboratively with general education teachers to support the students and provide differentiated instruction.

Lastly, our school’s foundation is built on personalizing school for each learner. Academic and social supports will continue to be oriented toward student success.

 

 

 

 

· Address how the school will determine if such needs have been met; and are consistent with, and are designed to implement, the state and local improvement plans, if any.

Response:

We will determine if the needs have been met through an analysis of formative and summative data, artifacts, analysis of student and teacher work, evaluation of student outcomes such as attendance, grades, discipline, and progress toward goals. Georgia Milestones, DIBELS, iReady data, classroom grades, classroom assessment, district assessments, Statewide Longitudinal Data System attendance, and discipline referral and outcomes data will be collected and reviewed.

 

We will also review our pupil service recommendations, implementation of preventions and interventions, and level of engagement in the school.

 

 

 

3. Instruction by highly qualified professional staff

Response:

Kilpatrick Elementary School ensures that teachers are highly qualified by following all district policies and procedures regarding the staff selection and hiring process. According to the Georgia Professional Standards Commissions teachers serving in Title I elementary schools are required to possess a valid teaching certificate in Elementary education (P-5) with the satisfactory educator assessment results. Certification status is updated and reviewed annually by Human Resources and building level administrators. At this time Kilpatrick Elementary has 42 Highly Qualified teachers out 45. We currently have 17% of our teaching staff with a Bachelor’s Degree, 51% of our teaching staff has a Master’s Degree, 18% of our staff has a Specialist Degree and 1% of our staff members has a Doctorate Degree.

 

We verify that our teachers are appropriately credentialed, have a deep understanding of the content they teach, and have been trained in a variety of instructional strategies to aid students in reaching academic proficiency. We assess this by reviewing teaching credentials and transcripts. We also conduct comprehensive teacher interviews to collect additional information about the candidate’s qualification to work with Kilpatrick’s students. Teachers, who are not highly qualified, work closely with their department chair, department administrator, principal’s secretary, and county level designees, and the Georgia Professional Standards Commission to remedy deficient areas in order to become highly qualified.

 

Kilpatrick Elementary School develops and maintains policies, procedures, and protocols to ensure a supportive school environment for each teacher through the following:

  • Assigns mentors to teachers new to the profession to address concerns, provide continuous support and feedback through informal observations and focused Walks.
  • Assigns mentors to teachers new to building to address concerns
  • Provides continuous support and feedback through informal observations and focused walks.
  • Provides mentors to veteran teachers upon request.
  • Schedules formal time for mentors regarding how to effectively serve in their roles.

 

New teachers will attend New Teacher Orientation and continued instructional support from the Teacher Development Specialists through the Professional Learning Department. They will also participate in an orientation session at Kilpatrick Elementary School conducted by the administrative staff. All other professional learning will be tailored to the needs of the individual teacher in a variety of ways, face to face or online.

 

 

4. In accordance with Section 1119and subsection (a)(4), high-qualified and ongoing professional development for teachers, principals, and paraprofessionals and, if appropriate, pupil services personnel, parents, and other staff to enable all children in the school to meet the state’s student academic achievement standards.

Response:

We believe that promoting the continuing education of the faculty and staff promotes the education of the student. With this in mind, our plan includes multiples avenues of professional development. Opportunities for professional learning will be based on staff self-evaluation, student assessments, and TKES. Teachers will identify areas of proficiency in various research-based instructional strategies and knowledge and then select opportunities that will enhance areas of need. These opportunities will be provided throughout the 2017-2018 school year. In addition to staff development opportunities at the school, all staff members at Kilpatrick Elementary School have opportunities at the district’s Professional Learning Center (PLC), as well. As permitted, staff members are also encouraged to attend conferences, symposiums, and other workshops that enhance a well-rounded educator. Workshops are not limited to academia, but will also include character education and personal growth.

 

Kilpatrick Elementary School aligns professional development with Georgia’s academic content and student academic achievement standards. We use data and curricular documents to identify content areas where our students did not perform well. We conduct a document analysis of state curricular to look for gaps. Once the gaps or areas that need improvement have been identified, we broker professional development our teachers, paraprofessionals, and administrators need.

 

We also use feedback from classroom observations to determine needed professional development. We know that our teachers need more learning support to better implement the explicit instruction/gradual release of responsibility framework. This school year, we determined that differentiated instruction was an area of concern based on Teacher Keys Effectiveness System (TKES) data. Therefore, differentiated instruction will be an area for professional development. Professional development will also include training in incorporating reading and numeracy strategies across the curriculum, instructional technology, and grouping models. Additionally, we will continue to provide training regarding data driven instruction to ensure that data is gathered and closely analyzed for the purpose of adjusting instruction.

 

Additional trainings will include higher order thinking and effective ways to increase parental involvement. Furthermore, we mandate that educators participate in any district required professional development.

 

We will devote sufficient resources to carry out effective professional development activities that are primarily job embedded and address root causes of academic problems. For example, we will devote resources to improve academic achievement for our students we must increase teacher efficacy. This is done through planned, consistent and pervasive professional development during the school day through the support of our instructional site facilitator and after school hours through direct instruction for teachers and staff. To that end, we have dedicated a large portion of our Title I funds to professional development including release time, resources, supplies, consultants, and materials to make the opportunities effective.

 

Many of our trainings will occur on site during monthly reserved professional learning times. Our teachers, paraprofessionals, administrators will learn from subject-matter experts. Learners will engage in a variety of school improvement professional development activities related to strengthen personnel competencies that are needed to effectively enable all students to meet state academic achievement standards. These activities will address school improvement initiatives, needs identified in the staff evaluation process, or mandated professional learning. We will continue to ensure our Title I Parent Liaison participates in all mandatory Title I trainings.

 

We will also provide opportunities for parents to engage in learning activities. Learning opportunities take place through Saturday Parent Academies, PTSA meetings, Curriculum Nights, and other evening meetings/trainings with parents. We will consultant with individuals or agencies to provide specific content or subject-matter training to parents. To encourage parent participation in these trainings, Title I funds will be used to provide parent resources and access to technology. To maximize funding, all professional development funds that include Title I, IDEA, Title II, District Professional Learning and other funds will be used to support our training needs.

 

 

 

5. Strategies to attract high-quality highly qualified teachers to high-need schools.

Response:

Kilpatrick will continue to participate in all district staff recruitment and retention efforts. Today, most if not all public school districts are struggling with attracting high-quality highly qualified teachers to high-need schools. All school leaders have the responsibility of ensuring students area are taught by highly qualified teachers, inducting new and novice teachers to the school, evaluating teachers to determine their efficacy and effectiveness, and retaining quality teachers.

 

Kilpatrick Elementary School examines its staffing data to determine the educators’ credentials. For example, we examine type and level of certification, educational degree earned, number of years of teaching, teaching experience, and area of certification. We use these data to match staff to needs. For example, Kilpatrick Elementary School practices, where possible, not assigning all novice and new teachers to 3rd and 5th graders.

 

We take advantage of technology, social media, word-of-mouth, and communications to share “good news” about Kilpatrick. This marketing strategy encourages potential staff candidate, students, and parents to investigate the possibility of becoming a member of the Kilpatrick Elementary School family. We also implement a variety of recognition and support activities to promote staff retention. Some of these activities are listed below.

· Implementing a New Teacher Mentoring Program

· Conducting Monthly Teacher Recognitions

· Hosting Bi-Weekly Professional Development

· Creating a culture of learning

· Practicing a shared leadership/professional learning community model through regular department and curriculum area meetings

· Facilitating open dialogue between staff and the administrative team

· Creating and expanding avenues for teacher leadership in multiple aspects of the school program

 

 

 

 

6. Strategies to increase parental involvement in accordance with Section 1118, such as
family literacy services.

Kilpatrick Elementary host parent meetings and trainings that are tailored to assist parents on how to help their students be successful in school. Activities are planned for English and Spanish speaking families. Attendees are provided an opportunity to provide feedback as well as request services as needed. The parent liaison leads the meetings along with the school administrator when necessary.

 

7. Plans for assisting preschool children in the transition from early childhood programs, such as Head Start, Even Start, Early Reading First, or a state-run preschool program, to local elementary school programs or to assist students with the transition to middle school, high school or college.

Response:

Kilpatrick Elementary School will for assisting preschool children in the transition from early childhood programs. We have also included transition plans for students entering middle school or Elementary School and for students entering from private schools including students entering our school throughout the year. Kilpatrick Elementary School not only aims to assist the families of our students that are currently enrolled but the families of students that will join our kindergarten team. The kindergarten students for the upcoming year are invited to visit our school. We partner with the parent resource coordinators from various childcare centers to host a program called Kindergarten Round-up which is held in May. At this time students and parents are invited to visit kindergarten classrooms and speak with kindergarten teachers. Our Title I Parent Liaison will be available throughout the school year to meet with rising kindergarten families and conduct school tours for parents who currently have students enrolled.

 

Transition into middle school is very important to us as well. Our fifth graders will be given an

opportunity at the end of the school year to tour our feeder middle schools. Once our students arrive they will be introduced to the administrative, guidance, resource and support teams. Afterwards, the present fifth graders will be allowed to ask questions. Students will be told about the curriculum and dress code at this time. Students will also be introduced to various music programs. In addition to these activities the fifth graders have a final walk through the school to say goodbye as well as a Promotion ceremony.

 

 

 

 

 

8. Measures to include teachers in the decisions regarding the use of academic assessments
described in Section 1111(b)(3) in order
to provide information on, and to improve, the
achievement of individual students and the overall instructional program.

Response:

Teachers will use the Statewide Longitudinal Data System (SLDS), Georgia Milestones, DIBELS, iReady platform, formative assessments, and summative assessment data in their decision-making. Kilpatrick Elementary School will train teachers to write common assessments, especially in core academic areas, based on standards. They will administer these assessments and use the data to gather information about the effectiveness of teaching and learning. Students will use the data to set goals and evaluate their progress toward meeting goals. Teachers and students will be trained on how to conduct these activities. Teachers are given opportunities to participate in the decision-making process of selecting, implementing, and monitoring site-based academic assessments

 

Schoolwide: Staff analyzes the schools’ performance on the Georgia Milestones End of Grade assessments at the beginning of the school year. Teachers analyze their students’ performance on content area/course common assessments to dictate daily instruction, and on-going classroom and content area/course assessments. This data shows the overall strengths and areas of improvement for Kilpatrick. This allows the content area chair along with the instructional site facilitator to make adjustments to the pacing guide to address the learning gaps. It also allows the current grade level to make a year-long plan that includes the previous years’ deficiencies and current deficiencies. At the end of the school year, all assessment data is used between courses/grade levels in the process of vertical planning.

 

Individual Classrooms: Each teacher maintains student and course data reports from SLDS the Statewide Longitudinal Data System (SLDS), Georgia Milestones, DIBELS and iReady formative assessments, and summative assessment data. This data helps teachers to plan for effective and differentiated instruction. These assessment tools help teachers to address growth and weaknesses and to monitor the achievement of each student on a regular basis.

 

To ensure that we are achieving our mission each year, grade level and content area teachers are provided with common planning time to discuss historical and current data trends based on assessments to guide their daily instruction. This common planning time allows teachers to make changes in the instructional calendar for pacing purposes based on results of assessments to ensure success for all students. Kilpatrick Elementary School utilizes collaboration, common grade level and content area planning and vertical team alignment of the curriculum to support all learners in accordance with the school’s mission and vision.

 

Title I funds at Kilpatrick Elementary School will be utilized to support English Language Arts, Math, Science, and Social Studies with supplemental instructional resources and supplies, afterschool/Saturday tutorial program including transportation for struggling students in the core content areas, instructional software, laptop cart to support instructional technology and content specific professional development for teachers. Title I funds will be utilized to purchase resources (books, brochures, newsletters, instructional materials) and computers for parents to be housed in the parent resource center and stipends for teachers conducting parent workshops/trainings after contracted hours.

 

9. Activities to ensure that students who experience difficulty mastering the proficient or
advanced levels of academic achievement standards required by Section 1111(b)(1) shall be provided with effective, timely additional assistance, which shall include measures to ensure that students’ difficulties are identified on a timely basis and to provide sufficient information on which to base effective assistance.

Response:

Kilpatrick Elementary School provides activities to ensure that students who experience difficulty mastering proficient or advanced levels of academic achievement standards shall be provided with effective, timely additional assistance. Using assessment data, especially formative assessment data, teachers will give student timely and actionable feedback. Remediation is offered both during and after school hours. Teachers and leaders will use classroom observations and student artifacts to also identify learner difficulties. We will use Title I funds to implement appropriate, targeted, and focused remediation, interventions, and preventions to support our student learners.

 

There are many measures at Kilpatrick Elementary School in place to ensure student success. As a part of our Title I school-wide and Comprehensive School Improvement plans, teachers and administrators monitor student success rates within classrooms by looking at the overall passing rates. Teachers monitor students’ ability to grasp concepts through daily informal assessments, such as observations, student responses in class, quizzes, and Common Formative Assessments.

 

Weekly, teachers meet in a collaborative setting to identify and discuss students’ academic needs. If a student is struggling, we require an ongoing evaluation of the student. RTI interventions, differentiation of instruction, small group/one-on-one intervention, and opportunities for co-teaching are strategies that also help to ensure that student weaknesses are identified timely. The Response to Intervention Model (RTI) enables our teachers take a more detailed look at instruction while utilizing continuous classroom assessment. The tiered approach in RTI supports students experiencing difficulties while increasing supports. As students move into tier two and three, parental involvement is a key component of the intervention. If students continue to exhibit learning challenges with curriculum a Student Support Team (SST) meeting is called to discuss further evaluation needs.

 

Technology is leveraged to offer support and ensure student success. Parents are encouraged to utilize Infinite Campus to view updated grades for all classes. Infinite Campus identifies missing assignments, failing averages, and specific test averages.

 

Students needing intervention for state and county assessments are identified and offered intervention opportunities. Intervention classes are offered in a variety of ways to capture the needs of our students. Students are offered opportunities for remediation and/or credit recovery afterschool and on Saturdays.

 

Title I funds at Kilpatrick Elementary School will be utilized to support English Language Arts, Math, Science, and Social Studies with supplemental instructional resources and supplies, afterschool/Saturday tutorial program including transportation for struggling students in the core content areas, instructional software, laptop cart to support instructional technology and content specific professional development for teachers. Title I funds will also be utilized to purchase resources (books, brochures, newsletters, instructional materials) and computers for parents to be housed in the parent resource center and stipends for teachers conducting parent workshops/trainings after contracted hour. Approved professional learning conferences will also be funded through the use of Title I funds.

 

 

 

10. Coordination and integration of federal, state, and local services and programs, including programs supported under this Act, violence prevention programs, nutrition programs, housing programs, Head Start, adult education, vocational and technical education, and job training

Response:

Kilpatrick Elementary School coordinates and integrates federal, state, and local services and programs to ensure that our students achieve academic success. We work closely with the Office of Federal Programs to maximize the use of Title I funds and to use them appropriately. We also use various academic department school-based budgets in ways to support teaching and learning. For example, our district pays for afterschool tutorial program for students at-risk of failing the Georgia Milestones Assessment. The district purchase intervention programs for reading and mathematics for all elementary schools to target the students identified as Beginning Learners.

 

Additionally, Academic Coordinators supply the school with several of the resources needed to implement the curriculum. We frequently conduct funding gap analyses and reviews our Title I plan to determine how our Title I funds can be spent. This ensures that we do not supplant. One of the supports we have for re-teaching and credit recovery is our after-school remediation program. The district bears a fixed cost for each school to implement after-school learning support program which helps students prepare for the Georgia Milestones. Because these funds are limited and set aside for a fixed purpose, we use Title I funds to offer additional learning support that are based on students’ immediate individual needs.

 

Because the district participants in the Community Eligibility Program (CEP), all of our students eat meals at no cost to them. We work with the district Nutrition and Technology Departments to ensure that students who qualify for free or reduced meals are identified in our Student Information System.

 

Title I funds at Kilpatrick Elementary School will be utilized to support English Language Arts, Math, Science, and Social Studies with supplemental instructional resources and supplies, afterschool/Saturday tutorial program including transportation for struggling students in the core content areas, instructional software, laptop cart to support instructional technology and content specific professional development for teachers. Title I funds will be utilized to purchase resources (books, brochures, newsletters, instructional materials) and computers for parents to be housed in the parent resource center and stipends for teachers conducting parent workshops/trainings after contracted hours.

 

11. Description of how individual student assessment results and interpretation will be provided to parents.

Response:

The district began the Georgia Milestones score report training by training at least one school administrator and the Instructional Site Facilitators. The three-hour training included a PowerPoint, sample score reports, and a binder to hold data documents. The participants then trained school staff. Following the initial training, the district created a Georgia Milestones parent and student training toolkit that included a PowerPoint, presenters’ guide, parent/student documents, and sample score reports along with directives for implementation. Each school leader is responsible for ensuring parents and students are trained on how to read and interpret individual student Georgia Milestones score reports. Our district has ensured that these resources are accessible to non-English speakers. We will continue to conduct these trainings annually.

The district, through the Office of Federal Program, also host an annual Georgia Milestones parent conference that includes a session on Georgia Milestones score reporting and interpretation.

 

Individual student classroom tests and other assessment results will be provided to parents through the mail or sent home. Additionally, we will hold frequent Assessment Conferences with parents, students, and staff to review various assessment results and to communicate how data can be interpreted and used. When students’ standardized test results are reported, parents receive the results along with an interpretive guide. Parents are also provided with their child’s progress reports every four and one half weeks, and the report card every nine weeks. These grades are also available in the Infinite Campus parent portal. Parents can also participate in academic conferences concerning their child. At the conference, they are allowed to view their child’s reported scores.

 

Kilpatrick Elementary School will host various Title I parent meetings and will provide parents with information about their child’s progress in school. We will also share with them various strategies they can use at home to help their child(ren) improve.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12. Provisions for the collection and disaggregation of data on the achievement and assessment results of students.

Response:

The Department of Assessment and Accountability for Clayton County Public Schools is responsible for the collection and disaggregating results from our state and national assessments, especially the Georgia Milestones, which is a state mandated test.

 

Data analysis is a main responsibility for teachers. However, the Instructional Site Facilitator gives guidance to teachers for implementing protocols to be used for reviewing, analyzing, and interpreting data. We administer various formative and summative assessments Edutrax, which is an electronic tool used to collect and disaggregate assessment results. Our teachers disaggregate and discuss student data during our weekly collaboration meetings. Teachers bring data and artifacts of teaching and learning to discuss to the weekly collaborative meetings.

 

Albeit Illuminate will be used primarily for local assessment collection and analysis, this plateform along with the State Longitudinal Data System (SLDS) will also be utilized to review and collect state assessment data. We require teachers, during their collaboration meetings, to review data by “All Students” and subgroups that include English Learner, special education, gifted, race, ethnicity, economically disadvantages, and gender.

 

 

13. Provisions to ensure that disaggregated assessment results for each category are valid and
reliable.

Response: The Georgia Department of Education (GaDOE) follows strict and accurate accountability procedures to ensure the reporting of statistically valid and reliable assessment results. The Department of Research, Evaluation, Assessment, and Accountability works with GaDOE to further ensure valid and reliable assessment data and to improve procedures to enhance the process, accordingly.

 

The summative assessment data utilized in the development of this Title I plan are derived from both state and national assessments that have been validated and administered statewide and nationwide.

 

The district’s Department of Research, Evaluation, Assessment, and Accountability is responsible for developing tools and processes that can be used to analyze and report performance data that meets the decision-making requirements of Clayton County Public Schools’ stakeholders, including administrators, teachers, other employees, students, parents, and the general community. The Department fosters the use of data by our staff through the implementation of training and the development of training materials that are shared with us.

 

14. Provisions for public reporting of disaggregated data.

Response: The Georgia Department of Education reports the results of the Georgia Milestones via the state’s website. We receive aggregated and disaggregated data via the GaDOE portal or the test vendor’s portal. Our 2015 Georgia Milestones school summary and student population reports will be posted on the school’s website by October 30, 2016. Additionally, the Governor’s Office of Student Achievement posts aggregate and disaggregated students and school data.

As a result of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act waiver, data are reported via the College and Career Readiness Performance Index. This information is found on GaDOE’s website. For stakeholder’s convenience, a link to the state’s website is available on the school’s website.

Lastly, Kilpatrick Elementary School will annually publish its state test result aggregated and disaggregated in a flyer that will be distributed stakeholders. This flyer will also be available for stakeholders in the Media Center, Parent Resource Center, Website, and front office. We will also continue to communicate student outcome results to parents and stakeholders at various school and parent meetings throughout the school year.

 

15. Plan developed during a one-year period, unless the LEA, after considering the
recommendation of its technical assistance providers, determines that less time is
needed to develop and implement
the schoolwide program

Response:

The current Title I Schoolwide plan Kilpatrick Elementary School is operating under was developed by stakeholders during the 2017-18 school year. However, the Title I plan is a living document that is frequently monitored and updated to meet changing needs. Meetings to review and give stakeholders the opportunity to provide feedback for the school-wide plan are conducted semi-annually. We amassed a committee comprised of various stakeholders to assist us with developing a school-wide plan that will help improve student achievement. This committee has been engaged in the school-wide Title planning process for one-year. Kilpatrick Elementary School uses multiple forms of communication to invite feedback and input on its Title I plan annually. An annual meeting for all stakeholders (parents, students, and staff) will be held to discuss data and changes to the SWP, input and feedback will be requested from all participants.

 

 

16. Plan developed with the involvement of the community to be served and
individuals who will carry out the plan, including teachers, principals, other school staff, and pupil service personnel, parents, and students (if secondary).

Response:

The school-wide plan is developed with the involvement of the community and individuals who will carry out the plan including teachers, principals, support personnel, parents and students. Prior to the beginning of the school year, the school’s leadership retreat was held. Attending the retreat were the administrative team, department chairs, and the instructional facilitator. These stakeholders participated in the initial development of this plan. The initial plan was taken back to the school to give staff, parents, and students the opportunity to be involved and provide input in the plan’s development. Specifically, parents were invited to attend the Title I School-wide planning meeting through flyers, phone calls, and other forms of advertisements. At the meeting, we collaboratively analyzed all of the current and historical data for Kilpatrick Elementary School– both academic and non-academic. All stakeholders had the opportunity to provide verbal feedback and engage in a variety of planning meeting sessions. We strongly encouraged participants to provide input at the planning meetings and through document reviews, parent surveys, and email.

 

Committee Members

 

Candice Jester, Principal

Jennifer Teagle-McGill, DES Teacher

Mark Lively, EL Teacher

Iyana James, Gifted Teacher

Krystle Shackleford, Kindergarten Grade Level Chair

Donnise Bartholomew, 1st Grade Level Chair

Tatia Beal, 2nd Grade Level Chair

Jennifer Rippy, 3rd Grade Level Chair/ELA Contact

Sheila Moses, 4th Grade Level Chair

Daphine Harris, 5th Grade Level Chair

Cristiane Idowu, Parent Liaison or Parent Involvement Contact

Elva Lumbard, Counselor

Anthony Rivera, 5th Student

Zion Mathis, 5th Student

Lillian Williams, Parent

Victoria Mills, Parent

Dr. Rosemarie Bryan, Early Intervention Teacher

Natalie Marson, Bookkeeper

Jasmine Boyles, Community Partner

Kelly Barnes, School SACS Designee

Valerie Pinkney, Science Contact

Neombay George, Social Studies Contact

Wanda Fair, Math Contact

 

 

 

 

 

17. Plan available to the LEA, parents, and the public.

Response:

A copy of Kilpatrick’s Elementary Title I school-wide plan is available to the LEA in the district’s Office of Federal Programs at the Clayton County Public School’s Central Office. Additional copies of the school-wide plan is available to all stakeholders via the school’s website, Media Center, front office, and the Parent Resource Center. The school-wide plan will be discussed at parent meetings including Open House, Curriculum Night, Title I Annual Meeting, and School Council Meetings.

 

18. Plan translated, to the extent feasible, into any language that a significant
percentage of the parents of participating students in the school speak as their primary language
.

Response: At Kilpatrick Elementary School, about 48% of our school population is Hispanic and 35% of our Hispanic students are English Language Learners. As a result, language translation interpretation services are available for speakers of languages other than English by district’s Title III/ESOL department. Translation and/or interpretation of the school’s improvement and Title I plan, to the extent feasible, shall be provided in any language, where there is a significant percentage of parents of participating students, whose primary language is a language other than English. To date, our plans will need to be translated in Spanish.

 

 

19. Plan is subject to the school improvement provisions of Section 1116.

Response: The Title I plan is subject to the school improvement provisions of Section 1116 which is to improve the academic achievement of disadvantaged students, and to involve stakeholders in the decision making process. The plan is updated annually with stakeholder input and monitored throughout the year. Kilpatrick Elementary is not identified as a Priority or Focus School for the 2017-18 or current school year.

 

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